Parenting teens is easy once you embrace being an embarrassment

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i didn’t write this, but I liked it so much, I reblogged it. This is also something that teachers and school guidance counselors might find useful. Kids are conflicted with the impulse to separate as individuals and clinging to their parents like the children they used to be. As a staff and a teacher, I’ve been very embarrassing (often intentionally and for my own amusement) and have found that when I stopped doing some of my antics, the kids are disappointed. They love it (secretly). They like to complain about it and they laugh but something about it is valued. I suspect it’s because it tells them that I love my job and love playing with them (even when I’m telling them something they don’t want to hear), but it’s also genuine. They know the laugh is real.

My son really hates it when I call for a price check. My son really hates it when I call for a price check.

Everyone with teenagers please raise your free hand. And by “free” hand, I mean whichever hand isn’t either guarding your wallet or refrigerator door. For parents without a free hand because you are guarding both, don’t worry; we can see it in your eyes. It’s that blank, pleading stare recognized and shared by all parents with teenagers.

It’s a look that says, If not for over-the-counter medication and America’s Got Talent, I would curl into a fetal position until my kids turn 20.

Part of what makes raising teens so challenging, aside from mood swings that raise the bar for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, is the lengths parents will go to avoid doing things their teen views as “totally embarrassing,” such as breathing while in the presence of someone they might know from school. Or making eye…

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The Importance of Informal Learning (Infographic)

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We don’t track informal learning in schools usually, but we see it in our after-school clubs and organizations. It might not be appropriate, but we educators should know what our students are learning outside of school academics. Kids are on the Internet doing things. Quality shouldn’t matter. The point is that the kids are doing more than we can imagine (although not all of it is positive).

To Talk Like This and Act Like That

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Key Sentence Skeletons | Parker Derrington Ltd

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http://www.parkerderrington.com/key-sentence-skeletons/

Parker Derrington Ltd

Recipe for Key Sentences in a Grant Application?

This post is about an easy way to work out what to write the 10 key sentences that define a grant application. There are two reasons I think it’s worth writing even though I have written about the key sentences several times recently.

A good set of key sentences is half-way to a case for support. A really good case for support consists of nothing more than the 10 key sentences and the text that fills in the detail and convinces the reader that the key sentences are true. Of course this extra text is much more than filler, but it is a great help to have the key sentences because they define the task of the rest of the the text.
Continued…

Adolescents’ development of skills for agency in youth programs : The Chronicle of Evidence-Based Mentoring

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This article indicates the need for promoting youth agency skills. This idea is closely related to grit and self-efficacy. It also suggests that this development may occur in the conative domain.

To Talk Like This and Act Like That

See on Scoop.iteducational implications

Results:

What youth learned: The analyses of youth interviews revealed 3 major themes for types of youth agency skills:

1) Mobilizing effort:  learning to devote the energy and time to their work

– common theme reveals that successful work requires effort and they had gained abilities to deliberately mobilize and regulate that effort

2) Concrete organizing skills:  learning rules to organize the tasks or elements of their projects

3) Strategic thinking:  “use of advanced executive skills to anticipate possible scenarios in the steps to achieving goals and to formulate flexible courses of action that take these possibilities into account”

– strategic thinking directs youth toward achievement of meaningful and challenging real-world goals and away from risk behavior (Romer, 2003).

Sharrock‘s insight:

connections between grit and resilience and Bandura’s efficacy theory.

See on chronicle.umbmentoring.org

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6-Year-Olds Know When You’re Making Sins of Omission

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Researchers have long ago identified the importance of credibility in leadership. Employees value credibility, just as knowledge workers require it as one of the main qualities in a leader. We should not be surprised that kids value credibility as well.

To Talk Like This and Act Like That

See on Scoop.itTeacher Tools and Tips

In a new study, kids gave lower ratings to teachers who left out key details about toys. And once misled, they inspected new toys more carefully.

Sharrock‘s insight:

Ryan Jacobs says, “Bottom-line: Explain the full-fledged functionality of Super Soakers to your kids or risk losing their trust forever.”

See on www.psmag.com

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