Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don’t Think They’re Smart – The Atlantic

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Dweck: “Actually, praise may not be the optimal way, but we are so praise oriented. We can ask the child questions about the process: “How did you do that? Tell me about it.” As they talk about the process and the strategies they tried, we can appreciate it. We can be interested in it. We can encourage it. It doesn’t have to be outright praise.”

How might praise emerge from appreciation?

Dweck’s conclusions about how praise works should help shape discussions about parenting, teaching, feedback, and also around the building of credibility THROUGH appreciation. The boundaries are dissolving between education and other knowledge work fields but also between educators and learners. Students will recognize real interest and appreciation of their thinking-work as truly valuing work. Attention is one of the main currencies of the knowledge era. The more attention being paid to what you are doing, the more encouragement you feel that what you are doing is valuable and valued. These are the face-to-face “likes” that do more than vaguely acknowledge you have accomplished something. When time is spent listening, evaluating the student’s process and progress, and asking questions that leads to more progress, students will deepen their interest, become more encouraged, and may increase in other areas as well.

This is true for any worker, though. In education, the teacher is a knowledge worker, and the public awareness of teacher supervision can give insights into Davenport and Maccoby’s recognition that knowledge workers often know more about their areas of expertise than their supervisors.

No teacher wants to simply be observed and assessed based on a pass/fail system. Teachers want to feel that the person observing them “gets” what the teacher is doing, what the teacher has accomplished. In the Danielson tool, this appreciation has the opportunity of expression when discussing planning and also in the follow up or post-observation debriefing. Cognitive coaching models are appreciation and credibility-building tools.

How have you as a teacher showed appreciation of student work? Is blogging with students enough? How might student-lead workshops fill this need for appreciation and praise?

or

How have you as a supervisor showed appreciation of a teacher’s  work?

How might cognitive coaching fill this need for appreciation and praise?

How might praise emerge from appreciation?

via Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don’t Think They’re Smart – The Atlantic.

via Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don’t Think They’re Smart – The Atlantic.

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