New York City charters leave thousands of seats unfilled despite exploding demand, study finds – The Washington Post

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“New York City’s charter schools are leaving thousands of seats unfilled each year despite ballooning demand and long waiting lists, according to an analysis of public data to be released Friday.

“The decision not to fill seats that are left vacant by departing students deprives other deserving students of places in the schools, the report argues. It also means that charter schools can appear to be improving, according to proficiency rates on standardized tests, even as the absolute number of children scoring proficient declines each year, it says.”

via New York City charters leave thousands of seats unfilled despite exploding demand, study finds – The Washington Post.

via New York City charters leave thousands of seats unfilled despite exploding demand, study finds – The Washington Post.

Study provides new insight into what occurs in the brain during the learning process – PsyPost

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With the neurological correlates of the learning process coming into focus, the scientists were able to delve into the differences among participants in order to explain why some learned the sequences faster than others. Counterintuitive as it may seem, the participants who showed decreased neural activity learned the fastest. The critical distinction was in areas not directly related to seeing the cues or playing the notes: the frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex.

These cognitive control centers are thought to be most responsible for what is known as executive function. “This neurological trait is associated with making and following through with plans, spotting and avoiding errors and other higher-order types of thinking,” Grafton said. “In fact, good executive function is necessary for complex tasks but might actually be a hindrance to mastering simple ones.”

“Grafton also noted that the frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex are among the last brain regions to fully develop in humans, which may help explain why children are able to acquire new skills quickly as compared to adults.”

“It’s the people who can turn off the communication to these parts of their brain the quickest who have the steepest drop-off in their completion times,” said Bassett. “It seems like those other parts are getting in the way for the slower learners. It’s almost like they’re trying too hard and overthinking it.”

 

Study provides new insight into what occurs in the brain during the learning process – PsyPost.

via Study provides new insight into what occurs in the brain during the learning process – PsyPost.

State Educational Systems – The Legal Basis for State Control of Education, School Organization Models, The School District Consolidation Movement – StateUniversity.com

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State Educational Systems – The Legal Basis for State Control of Education, School Organization Models, The School District Consolidation Movement – StateUniversity.com.

via State Educational Systems – The Legal Basis for State Control of Education, School Organization Models, The School District Consolidation Movement – StateUniversity.com.

5 C’s of Credibility by John Streitmatter on Prezi

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To Talk Like This and Act Like That

5 C’s of Credibility by John Streitmatter on Prezi.
https://prezi.com/embed/4oztcdxol9dn/?bgcolor=ffffff&lock_to_path=0&autoplay=0&autohide_ctrls=0#

Educators and learning leaders of all sorts, including employers, need to better understand what it takes to become a leader. Credibility is only one of the factors of true leadership.

How can we teach students to become leaders?

Character education is incomplete without exploration of leadership. It may be at the heart of complaints about favoritism, hypocrisy, lying, and weakness. Note that each factor contributes to the perception of credibility, including competence. How can we use this or similar models to teach students to become leaders? to define character? the importance of education to build competence?

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