Memory Recall/Retrieval – Memory Processes – The Human Memory

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The efficiency of memory recall can be increased to some extent by making inferences from our personal stockpile of world knowledge, and by our use of schema (plural: schemata). A schema is an organized mental structure or framework of pre-conceived ideas about the world and how it works, which we can use to make realistic inferences and assumptions about how to interpret and process information. Thus, our everyday communication consists not just of words and their meanings, but also of what is left out and mutually understood (e.g. if someone says “it is 3 o’clock”, our knowledge of the world usually allows us to know automatically whether it is 3am or 3pm). Such schemata are also applied to recalled memories, so that we can often flesh out details of a memory from just a skeleton memory of a central event or object. However, the use of schemata may also lead to memory errors as assumed or expected associated events are added that did not actually occur.

via Memory Recall/Retrieval – Memory Processes – The Human Memory.

via Memory Recall/Retrieval – Memory Processes – The Human Memory.

Tips and strategies for teaching the nature and process of science

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https://wonderlib.com/research-network/response/55818f0859526a550094d6a2

Could this be another reason why students do not pursue science? Because it’s taught like a history course or for English Language Arts, and it’s not taught honestly or accurately the way science is actually done by the professionals?

Tips and strategies for teaching the nature and process of science.

via Tips and strategies for teaching the nature and process of science.

 

 

Jonathan Bendor: A Toolkit for Solving Problems | Stanford Graduate School of Business

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http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/insights/jonathan-bendor-toolkit-solving-problems

” According to Bendor, the best problem solvers mix and match the cognitive shortcuts to reach their solution. The idea is growing in cognitive psychology that experts in information-intensive domains, like teaching, chess, or medicine, become skilled because they garner enormous mental libraries of heuristics and patterns, he says.”

A case for memory.

How is cognitive behavioral therapy like teaching/learning?

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I asked Wonderlib.com this question: How is cognitive behavioral therapy like teaching/learning?

Corina Obrero @corinaobrero, a freelance writer and registered nurse who is passionate about health, medicine, personal finance and investing, responded. This is her response:
Cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT is a form of psychotherapy which is based in the cognitive model. According to this model, our perception of things affect our emotions. Therefore, when a certain situation makes a person distressed, it is their perception about the situation that’s making them distressed, not the situation itself. CBT will help clients identify distorted or unrealistic thoughts that they may have. Once these clients learned how to identify their distorted thoughts, they will be able to change them and it will be easier for them to feel better and initiate behavioral change. A therapist performing CBT will act like a teacher who facilitates the problem-solving process of the client. The client should also be actively engaged in the process. The therapist will assist the client in identifying his/her problems. Once the problems are identified, the therapist and the client will develop an action plan to solve the problems that were identified. Therapists may also give homeworks to their clients as these will reinforce the client’s learning from the CBT sessions. Once the therapy ends, clients will be able to apply the skills they learned in dealing with everyday situations. Based on the description of how CBT works, it is evident that it applies the basic teaching principles that are also used in regular classrooms. For instance, it emphasizes the importance of active engagement from the client since this is vital for true learning. The therapist, just like the teacher, will not point out exactly what the problem is, he/she will just assist the client in discovering it on his/her own. During the problem solving process, the therapist will not dictate the “right” way to solve the identified problems. Ongoing evaluation is also performed to test the ability of the client to apply the skills that he/she learned, just like in the regular school setting.” https://wonderlib.com/research-network/response/55620002d1aa89fd0090e134 
Click on the link above to see the links that support her reponse.