When the Focus on ‘Grit’ in the Classroom Overlooks Student Trauma – The Atlantic

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http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/12/when-grit-isnt-enough/418269/?utm_source=SFFB

“We are asking students to change a belief system without changing the situation around them.”

“The transformative potential in growth mindsets and social-emotional skills such as grit may be more applicable to students whose basic needs are already met. When asking the question of why some children succeed in school and others don’t, he said the educators and administrators tend to overestimate the power of the person and underestimate the power of the situation.” (Excerpt)

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How America Became Exceptional – Forbes

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“The truth is that America as an exceptional nation is not a birthright to gloat upon, but a legacy to be lived up to—and lately we’ve been failing miserably.”

http://www.forbes.com/sites/gregsatell/2015/07/04/how-america-became-exceptional/

WHAT ARE THE COMMON FACTORS INCREASE EMPLOYEE RETENTION IN WORKPLACES AND STUDENT RETENTION IN SCHOOLS? Research Network Response | Wonder

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Brooke Petersen
@brooke_p writes: 

“While the actual process of student retention seems to be different from that of employee retention, the principles are the same. People need to feel that they are contributing and that they are capable of attaining their personal goals. If they don’t, they will be unsatisfied and want to change their approach to life, work, and education. In the workplace, having well-trained supervisors is brought up over and over. This provides your employees with a support system. In schools, the parallel is the faculty and academic advisors. These individuals must create a warm, validating atmosphere for students. Another repeated piece of advice for businesses is that they need to provide a path for employees to achieve their goals. This doesn’t necessarily mean salary increases; rather, it may indicate moving to positions where they can use their skills more effectively. In schools, advisors must help students clarify their goals, because many students enter college without them. Once desires for the future are solidified, advisors can help students see how their education creates a pathway to achieve those desires. Finally, something echoed in both spheres is that businesses and schools must respect their employees and students as people with lives outside of work and school. This includes understanding when they cannot work extra hours, being reasonable with homework assignments, and generally being flexible and offering empathy when situations arise. In the end, employees and students are seeking places they will be respected and allowed to grow. When they feel this validation, they will be encouraged to stay.”

via Research Network Response | Wonder.

via Research Network Response | Wonder.